Course Level: Graduate

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2435

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

Advocacy Lab is for those who could imagine working in national or local advocacy organizations that make change happen or anyone who wants to understand the art of issue advocacy as a theory and method of social change. An advocacy campaign attempts to impact public policy, most often through changes in regulations and/or legislation. There are a wide range of roles advocacy campaign workers, organizers, community leaders or think-tank experts can play from research and policy analysis to education, lobbying, public relations and organizing constituencies to reaching out to a wide range of influentials, legislative offices and other government officials. At the same time, the skills of public advocacy– listening, fund raising, finding areas of consensus and building on that consensus, finding ways to make change happen – are skills that can be applied to all professional and life settings.
The course will provide an overview of and training in how to affect public policy through advocacy campaigns, legislative lobbying, issue branding, coalition building and community organizing in the United States with experts and practioners providing us real life scenarios and case studies.

Course Code: PADM-GP 2407-001

Course School: NYU Wagner

Course Instructor: David Elcott

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

Democracy is not as natural a state as we might like to think. Many countries across the world are authoritarianisms, oligarchies or hybrid regimes in which the structures of democratic governance are distorted in the interests of a dominant elite. This often goes hand in hand with entrenched corruption. Together, these have serious implications for human rights, good governance, international relations, foreign investment and the progress of development. Many of these regimes are inefficient and brittle, but others manage to create relatively stable and even effective political and economic systems – in their own terms. When they fall, the consequences can lead to great steps forward for human rights, democratization and transparency, but they can also be unpredictable and even counter-productive. Drawing on examples around the world, this case-based course explores the causes, forms and implications of authoritarianism and corruption, as well as how and when change can be effected and its immediate and long-term results.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2415

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

This practical, skill-building course will equip students with the information and skills they need to develop, enhance, work in, or better understand international non-profit organizations. It will cover topics such as strategic planning, staff and board management, fundraising, budgeting, marketing and outreach, and quality control.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2165

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

Child soldiers, student revolutionaries, migrant workers and legions of unemployed youth are but a few of the important roles that young people play in national and international affairs. This course will consider a wide variety of ways in which young people help to shape the future. The course will begin with a discussion of international standards – the Convention on the Rights of the Child, other human rights treaties, humanitarian law and the Millennium Development Goals. We also will discuss the youth bulges that affect many countries, the graying of other societies, the disparities of gender, and cultural definitions of childhood and youth. Next we will turn to the complex positions of young people in societies in conflict – as fighters and casualties, as suicide bombers and drug runners, as perpetrators and victims of sexual violence and human trafficking, and as demonstrators and militias seeking to end or to sustain dictatorships. We will move on to the issues of peace-building that directly involve youth: demobilization and reentry; education, training and jobs for young women and men, and efforts to reconcile ethnic, religious or other groups after conflict. The course will then review the roles that young people can and do play in developing their societies: through their openness to social and economic change, their advancement in education and entrepreneurship, their adoption of better health practices, their engagement in sports, arts and entertainment, and their efforts to establish democracy.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 3045

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

The promotion and protection of the human rights of children is founded in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and strengthened by the adoption of international legal instruments and policies, which prescribe measures to ensure that children everywhere enjoy the rights to which they are entitled, and that children are accorded special protection and care. The course will examine the international norms and standards that make up children’s rights from the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and its three Optional Protocols, to the outcomes of World Summit for Children and a World Fit for Children. The course will also provide an understanding of how children’s rights evolve and progress to take into account the changing international environment, the changing needs of children, and the current issues that children are exposed to by highlighting issues such as, violence against children, children in peace and security, children’s rights in international justice, children and juvenile justice, and children’s rights in international development. Special attention will also be paid to the girl child. And with the world celebrating the 25th anniversary of the CRC, the course will also focus on the implementation and monitoring of children’s rights and ask the question? Is the world a better place for children?

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2341

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

Introduction to Community Organizing is for those who could imagine running national or local advocacy organizations that make change happen or anyone who wants to understand the art of community organizing. It will provide an overview of and training in contemporary community organizing practice in the United States. This includes defining what community organizing is and identifying its value base; exploring the strategies, tactics and activities of organizing; and thinking about marketing, language and evaluation. We also will examine the transformations of civic engagement and voluntary associations in the United States and the impact of these transformations on the ways Americans organize and advocate for change.

But there is a larger lesson here: The skills of community organizing – listening, finding areas of consensus and building on that consensus, finding ways to make change happen – are skills that can be applied to all professional and life settings. Through readings, class activities, cases studies, speakers and reflection, students will examine skills and techniques for effective organizing, including building a membership base, developing ordinary people as community leaders and running member-led issue campaigns. Students will also have the opportunity to reflect on and strengthen their own skills as community organizers and advocates.

Course Code: PADM-GP-2106-001

Course School: NYU Wagner

Course Instructor: David Elcott

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

International actors often apply different methodologies to assess conflicts. These methodologies help them determine the best ways to address a conflict and maximize their opportunities to prevent or alleviate crises. This course examines how international actors including the World Bank, UN agencies, bilateral donors and NGOs, analyze conflict and the interaction between conflict dynamics and their own engagement in a given country or region. The class will explore how analytical frameworks can be used to assess the impact of development, humanitarian and peacebuilding programs or projects on existing conflict factors and dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the concept of conflict assessment, its development and implementation; exploring different approaches to conflict assessment, including an examination of different implicit assumptions and theories of conflict; analyzing specific conflict case studies and identifying real and potential 3rd party responses.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2005

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Undergraduate

Syllabus

The position of those who collectively identify as a distinct group, generally seen as of minority status in the United States, an immigrant nation since its inception whose indigenous population was perceived as non-American, remains a volatile topic of debate that touches the core of American identity. In this course, we will focus on the status of a number of groups that have been identified as “minority” (leaving the term minority itself in question) within America’s cultural and political framework, examining how the debate over rights informs policy decisions and shapes identity and institutions. We will apply a range of theoretical constructs, seeking to define what “minority” status entails by studying how ethnicity, race, gender, sexual identity, national origin and religious identities, and their cultural expressions, play out in the public sphere. Attention will also be paid to community building – how public policies and leaders nurture or undermine collective identity and the communities they seek to build.

Course Code: IDSEM-UG 1986

Course School: NYU Gallatin

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

The exponential expansion of computer technologies and the internet have spawned a variety of new criminal behaviors and provided criminals with a new environment within which to operate. Cybercrime knows no physical, geographic boundaries as the internet provides criminals with access to people, institutions, and businesses around the globe. The reach of the threat defies conventional notions of jurisdiction of sovereign nations, thus making the targeting of cybercriminals particularly challenging for authorities worldwide. This course seeks to enter into the complex world of cybercrime by exploring its evolution and critically evaluating the foreign and domestic measures enacted to fight cybercrime. It further explores public and private investigations of cybercrimes, the problems associated with the prosecution of cybercriminals, and the efficacy of policing the internet. Some crimes covered in this course include (but are not limited to): the online sale of illicit drugs, online sex trade, cyberprostitution, child pornography, electronic espionage, trade secret theft, hacking, malicious software distribution, and cyberterrorism. Above all, this course focuses on the global legal, economic, and social impact of cybercrime and the international measures needed to combat it.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2510

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

Developing countries are under increasing pressure – from inside as well as from outside – to move toward democracy. Opposition parties organize even where it is illegal or risky. Human rights activists and journalists challenge dictators. Citizen groups demand government accountability and the inclusion of the poor, minority groups and women in politics. Western governments, the World Bank and civil society organizations push for reform. This class will examine the efforts to build democracy and the obstacles to that work in select countries in Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Latin America. We will discuss countries that have achieved considerable success in building democratic structures, others where the search for better government has become entangled in conflict, and still others where democratic movements are just beginning.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2060

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

In most countries, developing and developed, there is a considerable gulf between commitments to gender equality in public policy, and gender equality in public and private life, in states, markets and families. Woman’s lack of education, poor health, and lack of independent livelihoods is part of the cycle of underdevelopment and state fragility, and women’s empowerment has therefore been recognized globally as an international priority for peace and development. This course will look at the contemporary gender and development policy field. It will give close attention to the current global policy debate over the post 2015 development framework and the place of gender equality in it (mainstreamed throughout? Or a stand-alone goal?). This will include a practical look at the design of effective universal targets and indicators in the challenging area of gender equality and women’s empowerment.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2385

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

In this seminar we will explore one of the most exciting issues in contemporary politics and society: how women have organized, domestically and transnationally, to challenge and undo structures of oppression, exploitation, and subordination as autonomous agents of political, social, economic, legal and cultural change. We will begin by examining, from a theoretical perspective, the role gender plays in the construction of (international) politics and, conversely, how politics serves to construct gender roles and identities. Then, we will explore specific issues and case studies from all over the world: gendered notions of national security, women and sexual minorities in the military, how states seek to advance nationalist goals by controlling women’s bodies, limiting women’s sexual autonomy and access to reproductive services, punishing homosexuality, and the racialized domination of women and women’s bodies; how women self-empower and build their capacities in Muslim countries, specifically Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia and the Gulf States; how globalization affects women in the form of migration, sex trafficking and improved economic opportunities, the relationship between gender, globalization, and trafficking, and how African women contribute to peacemaking and nation-building. Key points that we will highlight throughout the seminar are how women protest and resist and how men around the world can and do participate as allies in the struggle for equality, justice, and women’s rights. Please note that throughout the seminar, we will define sex, gender, sexual orientation, and gender identity inclusively, transcending the traditional binary, to mean everybody who identifies as woman, man and LGBTQ.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2340

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

Good governance is central-stage as the essential condition for growth in low-income countries, and for human development as well. A number of the country assistance programs of bilateral and multilateral development agencies are predicated on a minimum set of successful governance reforms including anti-corruption measures and efforts to improve public administration efficiency. Good governance was missing from the Millennium Development Goals, and its inclusion in the post-2015 development framework is currently hotly contested, and being used as a bargaining chip by G77 countries in exchange for more relaxed conditions for aid. Good governance is the primary focus of efforts to improve the effectiveness of aid in particular in the 19 countries that self-define as fragile and conflict-prone. Definitions of governance range from a restricted view focusing on sound management of the economy, and a more expansive one that aims for political liberalization and addresses problems of social inequality. Governance has an important impact on the distribution of resources and public power between women and men. In addition, gendered power relations shape approaches to governance. This course develops an understanding of governance reforms in low-income contexts from a gender-sensitive and feminist political science perspective.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2390

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

The Global Field Intensive (GFI) model is designed for students to maximize their in-country academic experience by engaging in comprehensive pre-departure research and project planning. Rather than simply attending a series of lectures and site-visits while abroad, students are asked to become active participants in their field intensive in-country experience.

Past Intensives have included:

  • Bolivia: A Case Study in Sustainable Development
  • Rwanda: A Study of Justice and Reconciliation
  • Hague, Bosnia-Serbia: War Crimes Prosecutions in the Former Yugoslavia: The Pitfalls and Promise of International Justice
  • Gender and Sustainable Development in the Gulf Region: Abu Dhabi, Dubai and the Northern Emirates
  • Tanzania:  Humanitarian Aid in Complex Emergencies
  • South Africa: Challenges of Transformations

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

The Global Justice Clinic engages in work to prevent, challenge, and redress rights violations related to global inequality. Recognizing that our location at a well-resourced law school in the Global North gives us unique opportunities for advocacy and accountability, we seek to build partnerships with communities, grassroots organizations, and human rights groups negatively impacted by Northern-based governments, companies, and institutions. Working on cases and projects that involve domestic and cross-border human rights violations, the deleterious impacts of conduct by state and non-state actors, and emerging problems that require close collaboration between actors at the local and international levels, students engage in human rights investigation, advocacy, and litigation in domestic and international settings. Serving as partners, legal advisers, counsel, or co-counsel, Clinic students work side-by-side with human rights activists from the United States and around the world. The Global Justice Clinic is committed to working in a rights-based manner and uses legal empowerment strategies aimed at enhancing the capacity and agency of those most directly impacted by human rights violations.

Course Code: LAW-LW.10679.001

Course School: NYU School of Law

Course Instructor: Margaret Satterthwaite

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

This course examines the complex relationship between the Earth’s rapidly changing environment and the protection of civil/political (C/P) and economic, social and cultural (ESC) human rights, particularly in the developing world. Existing environmental conditions are being exacerbated by climate change in ways that will adversely affect residents of developing countries that are already struggling with highly stressed water, land, air and marine resources. Legal and policy options to confront these environmental challenges (and the related challenge of widespread poverty) will be examined in terms of their implications for both P/C and ESC rights.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2540

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

In this graduate seminar, students will study international human rights standards, topical case studies in Latin America, the role of international and local NGOs in the human rights movement, popular resistance and social movements in the Latin American human rights movement, the role of media and representation in reporting and promoting human rights, educational initiatives for human rights, and the many choices society has after collective violence.

Course Code: DRAP-GA 1045

Course School: NYU Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies

Course Instructor: Peter Lucas

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

This course is designed to develop practical advocacy skills to protect and promote human rights. A focus will be developing an advocacy strategy on a current human rights issue, including the identification of goals and objectives, appropriate advocacy targets, and appropriate methods. Students will explore broad-based human rights campaigns, use of the media, and advocacy with UN bodies, the US government, and the private sector (corporations). Over the course of the semester, students will become familiar with a variety of tools to apply to a human rights issue of their choosing. Case studies will illustrate successful advocacy campaigns on particular issues, such as sexual violence in conflict, keeping human rights offenders off the UN Human Rights Council and access to safe abortion.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2545

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

The trade in people and migration, whether knowingly smuggled across borders or trafficked and exploited as human commodities, is a scourge of the modern world. It is one of the globe’s fastest-growing criminal businesses, directly affecting over ten million adults and children worldwide. As well as a source of untold human misery, it intersects a wide range of other concerns, from the treatment of women and children across the globe and the survival of slavery in other forms to posing challenges to national and transnational security. Most countries in the world are source, transit or destination nations for smuggled and trafficked people, and this is a growing problem. Much is being done to deal with it, but to date with limited success. This course will thus address human trafficking and people smuggling not simply as human tragedies, but also as symptoms of wider global challenges, from the imbalance in economic opportunities to the impact of state failure. It will also have a strong policy dimension, assessing existing laws, campaigns and initiatives, from governments, NGOs, international agencies and the private sector alike, and challenging students to develop and advocate for their own proposals for constructive responses.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2355

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Undergraduate

Syllabus

The position of those who collectively identify as a distinct group, generally seen as of minority status in the United States, an immigrant nation since its inception whose indigenous population was perceived as non-American, remains a volatile topic of debate that touches the core of American identity. In this course, we will focus on the status of a number of groups that have been identified as “minority” (leaving the term minority itself in question) within America’s cultural and political framework, examining how the debate over rights informs policy decisions and shapes identity and institutions. We will apply a range of theoretical constructs, seeking to define what “minority” status entails by studying how ethnicity, race, gender, sexual identity, national origin and religious identities, and their cultural expressions, play out in the public sphere. Attention will also be paid to community building – how public policies and leaders nurture or undermine collective identity and the communities they seek to build.

Course Code: UPADM-GP-216-001

Course School: NYU Wagner

Course Instructor: David Elcott

Course Level: Undergraduate

Syllabus

The course traces the development and mechanisms of human rights norms and agencies in the post World War Two world through exploring the politics, history and cultural dimensions of human rights. And, in doing so, this multidisciplinary GLS topics course continue themes from Social and Cultural Foundations from concepts of human nature to ideas of how to construct a better society. How are human rights issues represented and identified on the local and global level? How does this link with how human suffering has been viewed and represented by a range of writers, photographers, activists and others? Are human rights universal? How do international human rights norms such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Convention on Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) frame rights and what is the gap between ideology and praxis, between the global and local? What has been the genesis and impact of more recent norms such as the right to a sustainable environment, to peace and to development and the responsibility to protect? How effective are UN agencies and other institutions in addressing human rights?

Course School: NYU Liberal Studies, Global Topics

Course Instructor: Joyce Apsel

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

Course Code: LW.11329.001

Course School: NYU Law

Course Instructor: Philip Alston

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

International human rights are not vague concepts of justice. They are precisely defined international laws, stemming from a series of international treaties and overseen by a complex of United Nations and other mechanisms. This course provides an introduction to international human rights laws (including special laws for the protection of children, women, racial minorities, and other groups); an explanation of the international procedures for overseeing their protection; and the methods used by NGOs in human rights advocacy. Particular attention is paid to international economic, social, and cultural rights, including the human rights to food, health, housing, education, and work.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2240

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

This course examines the international and semi-international institutions established to prosecute genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. The tribunals examined will include the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, the International Criminal Court, and their predecessors – the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg and the International Military Tribunal for the Far East (Tokyo); The course additionally examines some of the substantive law of the Yugoslav and Rwanda tribunals, particularly, the elements of the crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity, and individual and command responsibility. We will also examine the prospects of justice for serious crimes committed in places such as Iraq, Darfur and Cambodia. Students will be required to take a midterm examination, and to write a major research paper (e.g. 20 pages), based substantially on primary sources, due at the end of the course.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2205

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

In this graduate seminar, students will study international human rights standards, topical case studies in Latin America, the role of international and local NGOs in the human rights movement, popular resistance and social movements in the Latin American human rights movement, the role of media and representation in reporting and promoting human rights, educational initiatives for human rights, and the many choices society has after collective violence.

Course Code: CEH-GA 1048 

Course School: NYU Center for Experimental Humanities 

Course Instructor: Peter Lucas

Course Level: Undergraduate

Syllabus

How can we explain the many violent conflicts around the world today? What is the lived experience of people in conflict-affected contexts? What can international and local actors do to build peace? These are just some of the many questions that students will tackle in in this introduction to peace and conflict studies. Students will become familiar with theoretical perspectives, real-world examples, and analytical skills to better understand, critically evaluate, and respond to contemporary issues related to peace and conflict

Course Code: INTE-UE 1013

Course School: NYU Steinhardt

Course Instructor: Elisabeth King

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

This course is appropriate for students interested in the role that leadership plays in advancing social innovation and social change in the context of democratic governance.

The course explores the role of leadership in organizational efforts to change thinking, systems, and policies—taking into consideration the contested process by which the responsibility of addressing intractable problems is distributed among key diverse actors in a shared-power world. Traditional approaches to leadership defined by single heroic individuals who influence followers are contrasted with new perspectives—consistent with the demands of today’s complex problems—particularly when we aspire to inclusive, transparent and democratic solutions. Emergent perspectives reveal leadership as the collective achievement of members of a group who share a vision, and who must navigate the constellation of relationships, structures, processes and institutional dynamics within the larger system in which they are embedded.

Course Code: PADM-GP.2186

Course School: NYU Wagner

Course Instructor: Sonia M. Ospina

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

Mediation is one of the most effective processes for addressing conflicts, and seeking meaningful solutions to them in the quest for lasting peace. Mediation has been effective in building peace following destructive interpersonal, inter-community and international conflicts. This course will provide students with an intensive opportunity to learn and practice skills needed in the art of modern mediation. Such skills are increasingly in demand not only at the highest levels of the United Nations and its agencies, and by foreign services of national governments, but also by many international and national non-governmental organizations. Mediation is one of the most universal skill sets needed by diplomats and community development workers alike. The building blocks for practicing complex mediation and facilitation are basic communication skills. However, mediation is often confused with other means of alternative dispute resolution such as arbitration or conciliation. . Mediation is characterized by self-determination of the parties; mediators do not make decisions but rather facilitate the parties to discuss their viewpoints, generate new options and create effective solutions. Mediations are usually conducted confidentially in private settings. Impartial mediators, often working in teams, guide individuals and groups through a series of problem solving steps so they can find their own solutions. Many of the examples and cases will be drawn from different cultures and nationalities.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2275

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Undergraduate

Syllabus

With an eye firmly on the contemporary debate about Sanctuary, this course examines the history and activism of movements and communities that offer protections and rights for refugees, migrants, and precarious residents. The topics covered in the seminar include settler colonialism, citizenship, climate change, policing, militarism, ethnic and religious cleansing, gender regulation, labor exploitation, media infrastructure, healthcare provision, and the role of universities as speech centers and safe havens. The course will also offer resources for practicing the politics of sanctuary. The Sanctuary Syllabus can be found at Public Books here. This course reflects the realization of the Sanctuary Syllabus through a series of lectures, interactive activities, and collaborative group projects. Participating lecturers will include as many as twenty-five well-known NYU faculty, and there will also be guest appearances from advocates and activists across related social justice movements. This page will be updated weekly with lecture videos and course readings.

Course Code: N/A

Course School: NYU Gallatin

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

This course introduces students to monitoring and evaluation (M&E). It includes how monitoring and evaluation are different, why these are performed, how to design and implement both, barriers to successful implementation, how to identify when monitoring and evaluation are done well, how to use what is learned from monitoring and evaluation to advance program or policy goals, and how to integrate monitoring and evaluation findings into operational structures.

This is an introductory course. In other words, it provides students with an overview of the topics and offers resources and directions for those who wish to learn more. As an overview, introductory course, it is useful to both creators and consumers of monitoring and evaluation results.

The course is not aimed at a particular sector, e.g., government, nongovernmental organization or philanthropy. Nor will it focus on a particular domain, such as economic development, human rights, environment, gender, or the like. Rather, it teaches the tools and frameworks needed to work in any of these areas. Students are invited to use the assignments to explore issue areas and regions of particular interest to them.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2151

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

Peace is a difficult-to-define concept, one that often finds itself framed as the absence of something else: of violence, of conflict, of inequality or oppression. Yet, increasingly, scholars and policymakers are attempting to develop theories and practices that aim to “build peace” – not just as the absence of war, but in the mold of what Johan Galtung defines as “positive peace,” characterized not only by a lack of physical violence, but also by the presence of harmonious relationships, equality and mutual interdependence. Conflict itself is not the primary problem making modern society less peaceful than it might be; rather, the use of violence of all kinds to engage in many different conflicts stands as the main barrier to peace. This course will explore contemporary methods for peacemaking and peacebuilding as responses to real and potential international deadly conflicts, particularly in a post-September 11 world in which the state is being challenged as the principal structure embodying the collective aspirations of the individual. There will be an emphasis not only on addressing conflict through high-level diplomacy – often thought of as peacemaking – but also through the lens of what the international community increasingly understands as peacebuilding – a set of highly interdependent social, economic and political approaches to interstate and intrastate conflict. Peacebuilding goes well beyond state-sanctioned diplomatic efforts. It includes informal diplomacy and a wide range of formal and informal activities led by civil society or private-sector actors who aim to prevent, contain or end violent conflicts, and seek to establish conditions in which political, social, economic and identity-based conflicts are less likely to result in violence and more likely to produce constructive change. The course will serve as a platform for students to learn about these different methods, and to consider the potential effectiveness and limitations of each one.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 1010

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

Perspectives in Migrant Health & Human Rights examines the intersection of migration, public health and human rights. Through an online learning environment, students will examine current trends in the field of migrant health and human rights, with a focus on gaining practical skills and engaging in critical self-reflection. The course is also a forum where public health and related practitioners share their professional experiences and insights working with a range of migrant populations. The course will enhance students’ abilities to think critically and analytically about current problems and challenges confronting the field, and will complement conceptual and theoretical coursework, emphasizing the processes of implementing migrant health and human rights programming from the perspective of practitioners working in the field.

Course Code: GPH-GU 5288

Course School: NYU College of Global Public Health

Course Level: Undergraduate

Today, many documentarians consider themselves working within a well-defined human rights framework where images and film are used to raise awareness about social injustice. On the far edge of this movement, however, there are writers, photographers and filmmakers whose work calls attention to the traditional documentary ethics of bearing witness but whose modes of representation blur the lines between fact and fiction. This body of work is more open-ended to interpretation and multiple readings, which also include more personal themes such as loss and melancholy, the ephemeral nature of time and memory, nostalgia and change. We will study several different kinds of visual poetics such as combining documentary photos with literature, artists working with archives and found images, the personal essay film, ethnographic poetics, photo reportage and new media visual storytelling, mixed media and public projections. Some of the writers and artists we will study include Alfredo Jaar, W.G. Sebald, Chris Marker, Christian Boltanski, Forough Farrokhzad, Susan Sontag, Marcelo Brodsky, Roland Barthes, Miguel Rio Branco, Alexander Sokurov, Lorna Simpson, Jean Rouch, Susan Meiselas, Jonas Mekas.

Course Code: OART-UT 829 

Course School: NYU Tisch

Course Instructor: Peter Lucas

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

There is no one organization that has the full suite of capabilities, relationships or assets to tackle the world’s most pressing challenges. The persistence of disease, malnutrition and poverty highlights the need for solutions that are as multi-faceted, systemic and global as the challenges themselves. And in the context of receding public budgets, government has insufficient capacity to address these social issues. Stepping in to fill this gap, the private sector recognizes a reputational and commercial opportunity to partner with government and civil society to provide assets and competencies that no other sector can provide. These cross-sector partnerships take many forms, and have evolved over the last decade having learned from the experience accumulated to date. This course will use case studies to examine a breadth of partnerships, from the traditional to the innovative, in order to surface the gaps, strengths and future potential for private-sector partnerships.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2425

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Philip Alston and Grainne de Burca will select four films designed to provoke reflection and discussion about the challenges of securing respect for human rights in today’s world. We will use a range of recent movies to illustrate some of the principal challenges that are confronted by those who seek to hold governments and other actors to account for violations of human rights. Films from different parts of the world will be used to illustrate various themes and to provide a structure for discussing some of the difficult and contested issues in the field. The aim of the reading group is not so much to focus on the inhumanity involved in many of the situations but on the complexity of understanding the issues and of working out appropriate responses, as well as on the ways in which film and other visual arts can be used to highlight human rights issues, to give voice to different narratives and to present the complexities of situations.

Course Code: N/A

Course School: NYU Law

Course Instructor: Philip Alston

Course Level: Graduate

It has been ten years since the UN’s Commission on Legal Empowerment of the Poor found that four billion people live outside the protection of the law. Ten years on, this shocking statistic encompasses deep and broad forms of exclusion and oppression that persist today: o migrant families who are forced to live below the radar of the law rather than seeking its protection in the face of exploitative labor conditions; o pregnant women who die when their local heath center is again out of needed materials for an emergency blood transfusion; and o communities that are left without recourse when a mining company’s tailings dam breaks and floods farmers’ land with cyanide-laced water. These are all human rights violations: the right to be free from slavery and to enjoy fair working conditions; the right to healthcare and gender equality; the right to a healthy environment and to access a remedy. But what is the best way to tackle these problems? More and more, it is apparent that the old methods of “naming and shaming” are insufficient. Reports written on the basis of interviews and testimony are important and can advance reform in specific moments. But a more thorough-going change is needed to alter the basic conditions of those who live outside the protection of the law. Grassroots-led legal empowerment is a crucial part of the justice transformation that is needed. By engaging legal institutions directly, legal empowerment demands that justice systems become more accessible and responsive to the daily challenges of the people. Legal empowerment changes the conditions of life for marginalized people by ensuring they are the authors of their own liberation. Certainly there is a role for policy analysis, and litigation, and traditional human rights advocacy. But that role is one in support of the empowerment of communities most directly affected by exclusion, discrimination, and stigma. Communities that bear the brunt of systems of inequality should be in the lead when working to change them, with advocates, and lawyers, and law schools accompanying them where requested. As sure as it is that real change will emerge from the bottom up, it is also clear that lawyers–no matter their background–can play a partnership role in legal empowerment efforts. By supporting communities to push open the doors to justice and refusing to be gate-keepers, lawyers can join in solidarity with legal empowerment efforts. This reading group will examine the idea of legal empowerment, how it has been used by human rights advocates around the world seeking to transform exclusion, build responsive states, and ensure equality, and what the role of lawyers might be in building such movements. Seminars will include discussions with guests at the forefront of the legal empowerment field. Readings will include selections from the following: Vivek Maru & Varun Gauri, eds. Community Paralegals and the Pursuit of Justice (2018). Legal Empowerment, Special issue of The International Journal of Human Rights (2015). Project-specific readings related to legal empowerment programs in the United States and globally

Course Code: N/A

Course School: NYU Law

Course Instructor: Margaret Satterthwaite

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

Approximately one in every 200 people in the world is a refugee or internally displaced person. Uprooted from homes and communities, and often without government support, refugees look to the international community for protection. This course examines the system created for international refugee protection after World War II, as well as current policy and practice. It also considers the special circumstances and concerns of refugee women, children and adolescents, who account for more than 80% of the world’s refugees. Guest speakers from the International Rescue Committee, Human Rights Watch and other organizations address the class.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2320

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

This course examines reproductive health from a human rights perspective both nationally and internationally. After a review of the intersection of reproductive health and human rights, topics to be covered include: the demographic transition and declining birth rates; the rights of women with HIV infection and other vulnerable populations; men’s influence on reproductive rights; viewing traditional practices through a human rights lens; and current reproductive rights.

Course Code: GPH-GU 2312

Course School: NYU College of Global Public Health

Course Professor: Sally Guttmacher

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

This course follows a deductive pedagogy, moving from the general to the particular. It approaches the issue of contemporary security sector governance through a broad theoretical and historical literature. The first four classes establish a general baseline of primary sources and critical perspectives on security, development, fragility, and drivers of instability. The next six classes begin to drill down into the particulars of present stabilization, reconstruction, and rule of law programs. What do these programs seek to achieve? Who are key actors and stakeholders in modern security sector governance programs? Finally, what are the personnel needs of such initiatives and the institutions they seek to reform? Who are the right people for this kind of work and how does one find them? The final four classes deal with case studies of security sector governance in Liberia, Kosovo, and Afghanistan. The ultimate class returns to larger questions by exploring accounts of which programs worked and moving towards an explanation of why these were successful. Students taking this course will engage with scholar-practitioners on the dual task of how best to understand and implement programs seeking to bolster international security. Students will be examined on the basis of a research paper.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 3055

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

Over the past twenty years or so strategic litigation designed to uphold international human rights legal standards has mushroomed. Prominent examples can be found in the domestic courts of a diverse array of countries, and the strategy is increasingly being used to bring test cases before international courts such as the European Court of Human Rights and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights and before quasi-judicial international bodies such as the UN?s Human Rights Committee and the African Commission on Human and Peoples? Rights. At its best, strategic litigation in defense of human rights both tests and advances a society?s commitment to the rule of law. In its relatively short life, such litigation has freed political prisoners, given dissidents a voice, compelled far-reaching changes in education policy, promoted sexual and reproductive rights, tackled the problem of statelessness, and sent war criminals to jail. But going to court is costly, time-consuming and, at times, counter-productive. Critics have also condemned it as being a tactic by which powerful funders can distort priorities and promote national political objectives. This seminar will explore the practicalities as well as the complexities of such litigation and seek to identify the conditions under which it might be an ideal, or at least a viable, tool for promoting human rights. The seminar will be built around a series of case studies, the details of which will often be explained by the principal litigators. But it will also seek to take a critical look at the field through engagement with the relevant scholarly literature. The seminar will explore the definition of strategic rights litigation, its history and its recent evolution. It will scrutinize the practice of rights litigation including: its goals, challenges and tactics; how best to select cases; what considerations to weigh in marshaling evidence of violations for courtroom proceedings; the relevance of ethical considerations in guiding or constraining rights litigators; and the types of remedies that are available and the circumstances under which they might be effective. Against that background, consideration will then be given to questions such as: is rights litigation more (or less) successful in some countries, or in addressing certain kinds of rights, rather than others; by what criteria do we assess its impact; how important are factors such as national law, legal and popular culture, the judiciary, the bar, civil society, and funders?

Course Code: LW.12531.001

Course School: NYU Law

Course Instructor: Philip Alston

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

This course introduces participatory frameworks and tools that help students cultivate capabilities to engage others and participate with them in sustained collaborative problem solving within a highly contested public service environment. Examples of these capabilities, among others, include fostering and facilitating structured dialogue; seeing and helping others see the larger system; cultivating reflection to uncover and challenge assumptions that act as barriers to collaboration; practicing deep listening from the perspective of “the other”; recognizing, acknowledging, engaging, and bridging across differences in constructive ways; enacting values-based language in an embodied creative practice to “live” the talk.

Theoretically framed by ideas at the intersection of deliberative civic engagement and transformative participation, the course offers students a hands-on, experiential learning opportunity to practice the aforementioned and similar capabilities. They will also clarify their relevance for impactful action in their immediate and prospective circles of influence. Cultivating these will increase their chances to generate impact for the common good from any public service role associated with democratic problem-solving: whether it is as a policy or financial analyst, a policy advocate, a public a manager, a funder of public programs or a fund raiser to create them, an urban planner, an economic development or infrastructure expert, a community organizer, a social or a policy entrepreneur, or a public policy maker, to name a few.

Course Code: PADM-GP.2185

Course School: NYU Wagner

Course Instructor: Sonia M. Ospina

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

This course offers an introduction to the field of transitional justice. Although its main approach will not be historical, the seminar will examine the emergence of the field and of the notion of a comprehensive or holistic transitional justice policy, considering the factors that can explain that development. While paying some attention to the legal basis and to issues related to the design and implementation of each of the main constituent elements of such a policy (criminal justice, truth, reparations, and guarantees of non-recurrence), the course will be interested in exploring the relationship between these measures. Transitional justice has consolidated and ‘normalized’ in a fairly short period of time, which is a considerable achievement. The seminar, however, will pay particular attention to some of the challenges the field is facing today. We will therefore discuss questions about the scope and the reach of transitional justice (how effective is it in redressing different types of violations?), as well as issues concerning the fit of the policy to the various contexts in which it is presently implemented, paying especial attention to the way the model has migrated from post authoritarian to post conflict transitions.

Course Code: LW.10645.001

Course School: NYU Law

Course Instructor: Pablo de Greiff

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

How do states or societies that have suffered massive human rights abuses deal with the complex legacies of their past as they transition to peace and democracy? What can policymakers or activists do to defuse the bitterness of past conflict or repression and meet rhetorical and political demands for justice? These questions are far from theoretical: a significant and increasing number of countries that have pursued such policies in recent years, ranging from Morocco, East Timor, Sierra Leone and Peru, as well as many others. This course examines the ethical, political, legal, and practical challenges of designing and implementing transitional justice policies. It begins by examining the development of transitional justice as field of political and social activism, including its relationship to political science and international law. It sets out the developing legal framework that supports such activism, as well as the practical constraints and ethical dilemmas that both characterize such contexts and make transitional justice such a complicated field. Policy considerations derived from best practice are also discussed, including techniques for strategy mapping and direct public consultation. The course then examines specific elements of transitional justice strategies in depth. These include, but are not limited to: prosecution of perpetrators, and the growing shift from international-level mechanisms to hybrid and domestic tribunals; truth-seeking, whether conducted as part of official state policy or as a result of unofficial initiatives; the challenges in designing and implementing reparations programs; and complex issues of vetting and institutional reform. Questions related to transitional justice in situations of ongoing conflict will also be explored, as well as the many-sided concept of reconciliation. Readings will cover relevant international standards and methodological/theoretical questions. Real life policy examples from diverse regions will be used throughout the course, and at least 2 will be examined in depth.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2215

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

The United Nations is a global body with almost 200 member states and an avowed mission to keep peace throughout the world; to develop friendly relations among nations; to help nations improve the lives of the poor and conquer hunger, disease and illiteracy; and to encourage respect for mutual rights and freedoms. Nonetheless, it is often controversial, criticized by some for excessive interventionism, and by some for an inability to act on crucial global challenges. At a time of fast-moving change in the global system, can the UN retain its relevance and significance? The intent of the course is to provide both a practical grasp of how the UN works as well as an understanding of its origins, functions, politics and procedures. Particular attention will be given to the role of the United Nations General Assembly, the Security Council and the Secretary-General in the pursuit of peace, international security and global development. The strengths and weaknesses of the United Nations will be analyzed in light of the significant changes in international relations in the post-Cold War years with emphasis on peace-keeping, human rights, humanitarian intervention, post-conflict peace building, weapons of mass destruction, counter terrorism and reform.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2345

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

This course introduces some of the key challenges the U.S. has faced in responding to the terrorist attacks of 9/11, and analyzes the U.S.’s response from a legal framework. We will cover basic principles on the use of force, and then apply them to examining the legal foundations for the coalition interventions in Iraq (2003) and Afghanistan. We will discuss whether the situation should be understood as a “Global War on Terror” (“GWOT”) or something else. We will discuss some of the difficult issues as to the conduct of the “war”—including the responsibilities of an occupying power, permissible targets, means of targeting, the scope of the “field of battle,” and legal issues related to conducting counterinsurgency operations. We will cover the various options for U.S. terrorism trials—military commissions, federal court trials or whether new “national security courts” should be created. We will discuss the newly codified “crime of aggression,” as well as the international terrorism conventions. Another focus will be the use of “enhanced interrogation” techniques and “extraordinary renditions,” and the extent to which there has been an accounting, or should be an accounting, by the U.S. as to such practices. Finally, we will examine the domestic and international ramification of “GWOT,” and ultimately the effectiveness of the U.S.’s strategy, as well as what alternative options might have been pursued. Throughout the course, we will consider a broad range of academic, military and government perspectives on the above topics, and a broad diversity of viewpoints is encouraged.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2115

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

Understanding conflict is a crucial life skill. Unbridled, poorly-managed conflict plays a leading role in most social problems. Yet, suppressed conflict can be equally damaging – enabling dysfunctional, unjust or oppressive social structures to endure. There is growing interest in ‘People Power’ or ‘Nonviolent conflict,’ especially after it has shaken the world in 2011, starting from the Arab Spring though Mediterranean summer, all the way to the Occupy Movement in US and protests in Putin`s Russia. This intensive, practitioner-taught course is devoted to understanding the real nature of nonviolent social change. Students will explore how nonviolent movements are shaping national, regional, and international relations and study the principles and practicalities of non-violent conflict.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2590

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

This course aims to familiarize students with women’s human rights in an international context. We will look at feminist critiques of today’s human rights law regime. We will then consider specific human rights issues affecting women, including domestic violence, prostitution and sex trafficking, reproductive rights, health, development, and women in war. Students will gain an understanding of the underlying ethical and legal issues involved, international legal efforts to protect women’s rights, the international and national procedures for insuring their implementation, and methods used by NGOs in advocating for women’s rights.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 2360

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies

Course Level: Graduate

Syllabus

That conflict affects women and men, girls and boys in different ways is hardly a major insight, yet security sector analysts and policy-makers continue to have considerable difficulty accepting that this gendered impact of conflict ought to shape international, regional, or local policies aimed at conflict prevention, resolution, or peacebuilding. Even more challenging is the suggestion that gender relations could affect the triggers and causes of conflict or the conduct and the resolution of conflict, or the sustainability of peacebuilding efforts. An immediately obvious consequence is that women and girls figure in popular and policy treatments of conflict mainly as victims, and their various roles as participants in fighting forces, rebuilders and peace leaders, are obscured or ignored. This has resulted in their exclusion from decision-making on peace deals and post-conflict recovery processes including transitional justice and economic recovery. Recovery processes can therefore re-entrench or even strengthen conservative or pre-conflict versions of gender relations and women’s rights. The course will be taught as a weekly seminar for 14 weeks. The entire course will be linked to current policy debates on this issue in international peace and security institutions, notably the United Nation’s Security Council, and the new (since 2005) Peacebuilding Commission, as well as regional and national security institutions including national action plans to institutionalize normative commitments to women’s rights and the women peace and security agenda. The major focus will be women’s role in conflict resolution, reconciliation, and long-term peacebuilding. Peacebuilding is a complex and uncertain process and its success is essential to the prevention of renewed conflict. Topics to be covered will include gender issues in peace processes, conflict-related humanitarian crises, post-conflict policy priorities such as disarmament, demobilization and reintegration, transitional justice and reparations and long-term peacebuilding, Students will be encouraged to analyze the politics of international policy-making in the security field and to simulate policy-advocacy through persuasive argumentation (for instance in Op Eds and briefings). In addition, a class exercise will involve drafting a resolution on women and peacebuilding and simulating a Security Council negotiation over the text.

Course Code: GLOB1-GC 3075

Course School: NYU School of Professional Studies